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A copy of Bristles was kindly sent to me by Donna Callea in exchange for an honest review. Cinderella meets steampunk meets dystopian. The book moved far too slowly for my liking and Bryssa seemed to spend a lot of time thinking about doing stuff without actually bothering to do any of it. I found the characters quite bland and frankly ridiculous at times; I actually liked Bryssa to begin with but bef A copy of Bristles was kindly sent to me by Donna Callea in exchange for an honest review.

I think I just wanted it to be so much more than it was, as there is so much potential within it. I was so intrigued by the idea but it sadly fell short of my expectations. Apr 21, Karen rated it really liked it. Another great offering by Donna Callea. A little bit of Cinderella, and little bit of Divergent. Apr 19, Tammie rated it it was amazing. I received a copy of this eBook in exchange for a fair review. I adored this book from the start. You need to be in to retellings and fairy tales, and able to accept a bit of mild dystopia.

It is so much more than a typical retelling. There are many changes to Cinderella's situation. Without giving too much away, she is nicknamed Bristles, because her step mother forces her to have her hair buzz cut regularly. Unlike Cinderella, she has jet black, shiny hair. Rather than meeting at a ball, she m I received a copy of this eBook in exchange for a fair review.

Rather than meeting at a ball, she meets the heroic Prince at the barber shop. And they secretly meet many times afterwards, developing their trust, friendship, and romance. Her father's death is a mystery they try to solve together, unlike the classic heart attack story. Also, her mother's identity and heritage is explored, which is where the dystopia comes in. Her mother may have had secret powers. Her step mother may have had a role in her father's death.

She is much more power hungry than in the fairy tale. Brissa is timid like Cinderella, but willing to take action. She also has a driver on her side and willing to aide with a potential escape. Also, she is willing to leave alone, and not at the mercy of the Prince marrying her for her freedom. This really is a great book. I read it in two sessions. It kept my interest from the beginning, unlike stories that take some time to get to know. The character development was excellent.

Nov 27, Toni Owen-Blue rated it it was ok. Characters, who have previously been established to have no interest in fashion and physical appearance, manage to make comments on it constantly, even a dying man manages to talk about her hair in the process of expiring. That is not me over stating, it comes up an extraordinary amount.

I understand that her hair is supposed to be representative of her lack of agency in her situation. However, this leads me on to a point of the book I found very difficult to stomach. Her supposed physical abuse, which is just casually mentioned in a conversation about her hair that our protagonist has with her friends, the fact she was so badly beaten she could barely sit is brushed over in favour of discussing her bangs.

If you have been beaten so badly you can barely sit you have bigger problems than a hairstyle, and I find treating the subject of child-abuse in that manner nothing short of insensitive at the very least. But, on with my review. I cared little for Bryssa, or Bristles named for her hideous haircut , our protagonist.

She stated a desire to escape her unfair circumstances near the beginning. I thought we were in for a ride with a spunky young protagonist, but her emotional range gets smaller as the book goes on and she actually does very little to achieve her own goals, being content to wait for an idea when another character suggests vaguely that he might be able to help her, just later. The only time I ever got any sense of passion from Bryssa was when she was talking about Ayden, her love interest. From there he fixates on her, follows her and skips out on his very fancy school for her — despite being nearly Adonis in appearance, from what I understand, the very rich son of a very important official, and her terrible haircut.

The world is flat and does absurd things that Bryssa actually points out makes no sense within the lore of the world and as the book progresses I get the feeling the writer gets bored with her own story, grammatical errors and typos start to appear and the reader gets catapulted from event to event. I am not even joking when I say that one chapter ends with her beginning a journey, and the next opens with her waking up at her destination.

I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. Oct 07, Madison Keller rated it it was ok Shelves: Bristles starts out very interesting, despite the prologue that tells us nothing that doesn't come up again in the first chapter.


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I'll even go so far as to say the story would have been stronger without it. When the story opens, Bryssa, or Bristles, is trying to stand up for herself for the first time, when she refuses to go get her monthly haircut. In retaliation, her step-mother gives her an even worse haircut. But things are looking up when Bryssa meets the Prince, I mean the High Chairman's s Bristles starts out very interesting, despite the prologue that tells us nothing that doesn't come up again in the first chapter.

My first problem comes with the almost obsessive way the author circles us back to Bryssa's haircut again and again and again and again and Unlike some of the other reviews I read before I purchased this book, I didn't have a problem with the 'Love Story' between the Prince, sorry Chairman's son, mainly because the two protagonists are so young, and young people can be very single minded and obsessive about things like that. Anyway, after finding one of her father's old books in the library seriously, why did it take her 9 years to finally break in? With her fairy godmother's help, oops, the Chauffeur Meck's help, Bryssa escapes, but she pines everyday for her lost Prince.

Up to this point the story was interesting, although it is marred by an abundance of narration, with Bryssa summarizing conversations that we are right in the middle of Tell-Mode. It is a big pet-peeve of mine, and detracted quite a lot from the story. I also couldn't quite see the point, as it would have been easier to just have everything in dialogue form, instead of dialogue, summary of more dialogue, dialogue. Once Bryssa escapes, however, the plot is rife with holes so big you could fly a blimp through them. Why did Undecky show Bryssa the tree?

Why did Undecky talk to her at all, but not talk to the people of Fiss? Why didn't Bryssa take the Prince to Plist nicer town that is supposed to be the technological equal of Ereba for healing? Especially when she knew what was waiting for her in Ereba? Why was her step-mother arrested I mean, the only crime we, the readers, saw was the haircuts and while bad probably were not technically illigal? We are told she is arrested and tried, but not what her crimes are. The story could have been saved by Callea nailing the ending.

Sadly, the climax of the book was the most disappointing. The entire thing is TOLD to us, the reader, by Bryssa, who wasn't even there, she was watching things and getting news second-hand. At this point I'll draw an analogy to explain the problem I had with this. Say you have a friend. He really really enjoys a certain TV show.

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But rather than let you watch it with him, he tries to describe each episode, but he leaves out key details and jumps around in the timeline. Pretty boring and confusing right? This ending was like listening to that friend describe the show. It would have been better to just let you watch the show with him. Up until the end, I was going to give this book three stars. But that dud of a ending fell flat, and forced me to take off another star. Apr 24, Nancy rated it really liked it Shelves: I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Cinderella plus repressive dystopian society equals Bristles Bryssa is a sixteen year old girl, born into privilege and forced by her cruel stepmother to live the life of a pauper following her father's death. In order to break down Bryssa's spirit and force compliance, her stepmother, called "Ma'am" by her orders, takes Bryssa to a men's barber shop every month to have her hair clipped short. Not ju I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. However, despite the abysmal treatment she is forced to endure, Bryssa does not let Ma'am break her spirit and often dreams of escaping Erba, the repressive society in which she lives.

In Erba, everyone does as they are told. They attend the schools specifically assigned to them based on class, and they train for jobs deemed appropriate for their income level. There is no chance for advancement. There is no hope of becoming "better" than you already are, financially. Though she is privileged by birth, her stepmother's influence has relegated her to the poverty-stricken working class.

Bryssa falls in love with Aydan, the future ruler of Erba - knowing full well that Ma'am would never allow such a relationship, as Bryssa is "not good enough" for Aydan, and Ma'am wants to marry her own daughter off to him. Her feelings are returned, but Bryssa cannot stay in Erba, cannot live the life Ma'am has planned for her. She longs to escape, to venture to Fiss, the village that was home to her mother. So she must leave Aydan behind and escape the life she knows. I really enjoyed Bristles. Bryssa is a strong, likeable character. I immediately related the story to the known fairytale Cinderella, but other than the basic premise - deceased parents, evil stepmother, royal love interest - the story is not so much Cinderella.

I like that Bryssa is a much more likeable character, much stronger, and wants to make her own fairy tale come true. The plot was, for the most part, well though out and well developed. However, I thought the ending was a bit rushed. It felt like the author thought the story was getting too long and needed to be wrapped up neatly and quickly.

I would have liked more information on the revolution, more detail. Other than that, the book was very enjoyable. Sep 08, Sarah rated it really liked it Shelves: This was a really interesting book; it was a kind of combination between magic and dystopian societies, but it was blended together extremely well.

When it started out, it was almost point by point for Cinderella. Its her and her dad, then he marries a women with two brats, and then he dies and the girl is mistreated by her step-mother, and there's a rich prince charming. Not really unique, but as the plot developed more, there were some more depth and detail. The entire Okey Dokey The entire world was very diverse which was cool to read. There was a stark difference between the bleak drabness of Erba, Bristles home country, and the bright, colorful, and spiritual Fiss, her mother's native country. Erba was very technological and had a huge regard for class and proper positioning in society.

Whereas Fiss is very natural and egalitarian and still functions just as well as Erba. There was something that confused me though: So it just seemed to be a mix of different time periods, so I couldn't get a good idea of the time period. However, I think that was supposed to be irrelevant, almost like this is all on a different planet.

A huge thing that I loved about this book was that the impossible was made possible. Several times, Bristles was put into a situation that seemed like there was no way out: I couldn't fabricate any sort of escape plan with the given background knowledge and it was almost depressing. But then, she would find a way to get past any boundaries in her way and get done what needed to be done. She is a very strong character and it was amazing to see her grow in confidence and bravery throughout the book, not to mention her skills.

She starts as a little bug trapped under her mother's boot, but then grows to be much more than anyone's expectations. Two little things left: It was straightforward not extremely complicated. I wish I could take a nap in a tree I'll put that on my bucket list: It took a story that almost everyone is familiar with and made it completely its own. I have read a ton of Cinderella retellings, and Bristles is right up there with Ella Enchanted and Cinder!

Like I said before, I really like how the author made this story her own. It doesn't stick to all the elements of Cinderella, but it is still recognizable as a Cinderella retelling. That can be 4. That can be really hard to do. One thing that may seem minor to some people, but that I really liked, is that the main character's name is Bryssa, not Ella like almost every other Cinderella tale.

I mean, I know that's the original name, but it's nice to have something different every once in a while. Also, the fact that it is steampunk was awesome. The 'hair' element was also really interesting, and something that made this story really stand out. At first I thought, "Well, it's not so that she has to get her head shaved," but then I thought about how I would feel if that happened to me, and I realized how terrible it would be! The characters were all really well developed. There was not a single one that I can say wasn't a 'good' character.

The one thing I didn't like was that Aydan and Bryssa seemed to fall in love really fast. I wouldn't say it was insta-love, because compared to other YA novels, it happened waaay slower, but it still was pretty quick. It's definitely one of my favorites in the 'retellings' genre so far! Aug 15, Lauren rated it liked it Shelves: I really struggled on whether to give 2 or 3 stars, but 3 stars won out because I did enjoy the story and Callea is a good writer, despite the problems I had with the book.

There was a beautiful, but unfortunate girl who had to live with her evil stepmother and two 'ugly' stepsisters, a fairy godmother in the form of Meck, love story to the 'Prince' of Erba, a grand ball that she couldn't attend but her stepsisters could, etc. How many more parallels can you get? I wanted some more originality! The other big issue I had was the love story between Bryssa and Aydan. I found it to be very unrealistic - they literally fell in love after meeting each other once.

I wanted more development to their relationship especially since Bryssa and Aydan pine after each other for the rest of the book. Once the second half of the book kicks in, say goodbye to most of the Cinderella story and say hello to a pretty good dystopian fiction story with a little fantasy mixed in. If the book had only been the second half, I would have definitely given it a better rating and review. I really liked finding out more about where Bryssa came from and learning what makes the Fiss so different from the rest of the world although I do still have some questions there.

Overall, anyone who likes YA dystopian fiction will like this read - I just had a hard time getting around the Cinderella parallels.

Apr 18, Meaghan rated it liked it Shelves: First, Thank you Donna Callea for a copy of Bristles for a review. Bristles is a mix between a Cinderella fairy tale and a dystopia novel. They story is very interesting and it keeps the pages turning. I liked Bryssa, the main character, and thought her story was fun to follow. I do think her relationship with Aydan was a bit of instalove but I think that plays into the fairy tale aspect a bit. I do wish the relationship was explored a bit more and there First, Thank you Donna Callea for a copy of Bristles for a review. I do wish the relationship was explored a bit more and there was more buildup into their relationship.

I think that would help solidify their love some at times it felt more of puppy love than an actual, forever love. I also wish, likewise, some other scenes were more detailed to help build the suspicion of what was happening. Overall, as stated earlier, this was a fun read and definitely kept the pages turning. Characters, who have previously been established to have no interest in fashion and physical appearance, manage to make comments on it constantly, even a dying man manages to talk about her hair in the process of expiring.

That is not me over stating, it comes up an extraordinary amount. I understand that her hair is supposed to be representative of her lack of agency in her situation. However, this leads me on to a point of the book I found very difficult to stomach. Her supposed physical abuse, which is just casually mentioned in a conversation about her hair that our protagonist has with her friends, the fact she was so badly beaten she could barely sit is brushed over in favour of discussing her bangs.

If you have been beaten so badly you can barely sit you have bigger problems than a hairstyle, and I find treating the subject of child-abuse in that manner nothing short of insensitive at the very least. But, on with my review. I cared little for Bryssa, or Bristles named for her hideous haircut , our protagonist. She stated a desire to escape her unfair circumstances near the beginning.

I thought we were in for a ride with a spunky young protagonist, but her emotional range gets smaller as the book goes on and she actually does very little to achieve her own goals, being content to wait for an idea when another character suggests vaguely that he might be able to help her, just later. The only time I ever got any sense of passion from Bryssa was when she was talking about Ayden, her love interest. From there he fixates on her, follows her and skips out on his very fancy school for her — despite being nearly Adonis in appearance, from what I understand, the very rich son of a very important official, and her terrible haircut.

The world is flat and does absurd things that Bryssa actually points out makes no sense within the lore of the world and as the book progresses I get the feeling the writer gets bored with her own story, grammatical errors and typos start to appear and the reader gets catapulted from event to event. I am not even joking when I say that one chapter ends with her beginning a journey, and the next opens with her waking up at her destination.

I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. Top rated Most recent Top rated. All reviewers Verified purchase only All reviewers All stars 5 star only 4 star only 3 star only 2 star only 1 star only All positive All critical All stars All formats Format: There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. There was a problem loading comments right now. I received a copy of this eBook in exchange for a fair review. I adored this book from the start. You need to be in to retellings and fairy tales, and able to accept a bit of mild dystopia. It is so much more than a typical retelling. There are many changes to Cinderella's situation. Without giving too much away, she is nicknamed Bristles, because her step mother forces her to have her hair buzz cut regularly.

Unlike Cinderella, she has jet black, shiny hair. Rather than meeting at a ball, she meets the heroic Prince at the barber shop. And they secretly meet many times afterwards, developing their trust, friendship, and romance. Her father's death is a mystery they try to solve together, unlike the classic heart attack story. Also, her mother's identity and heritage is explored, which is where the dystopia comes in. Her mother may have had secret powers. Her step mother may have had a role in her father's death. She is much more power hungry than in the fairy tale.

Brissa is timid like Cinderella, but willing to take action. She also has a driver on her side and willing to aide with a potential escape. Also, she is willing to leave alone, and not at the mercy of the Prince marrying her for her freedom. This really is a great book. I read it in two sessions. It kept my interest from the beginning, unlike stories that take some time to get to know. The character development was excellent. It took a story that almost everyone is familiar with and made it completely its own. I have read a ton of Cinderella retellings, and Bristles is right up there with Ella Enchanted and Cinder!

Like I said before, I really like how the author made this story her own. It doesn't stick to all the elements of Cinderella, but it is still recognizable as a Cinderella retelling. That can be really hard to do. One thing that may seem minor to some people, but that I really liked, is that the main character's name is Bryssa, not Ella like almost every other Cinderella tale. I mean, I know that's the original name, but it's nice to have something different every once in a while.

Also, the fact that it is steampunk was awesome. The 'hair' element was also really interesting, and something that made this story really stand out. At first I thought, "Well, it's not so bad that she has to get her head shaved," but then I thought about how I would feel if that happened to me, and I realized how terrible it would be! The characters were all really well developed. There was not a single one that I can say wasn't a 'good' character.

The one thing I didn't like was that Aydan and Bryssa seemed to fall in love really fast. I wouldn't say it was insta-love, because compared to other YA novels, it happened waaay slower, but it still was pretty quick. It's definitely one of my favorites in the 'retellings' genre so far!

dytorafe.tk: Customer reviews: BRISTLES: a Cinderella retelling

Well written, well developed story line with charcters you either love or love to hate. Cinderella was never so strong as our Bristles. She survives, without becoming bitter and angry but never wimps out, and manages to change not just her own life in the process. Down-trodden workers, tree huggers, mad scientists, and girl with a spirit that will not be crushed. And I love the cover art! It's next on my daughters reading list now. I recieved a free copy of this book from reading deals in exchange for an honest review. I think that's fair enough, especially as the book was so enjoyable.

I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Cinderella plus repressive dystopian society equals Bristles Bryssa is a sixteen year old girl, born into privilege and forced by her cruel stepmother to live the life of a pauper following her father's death. In order to break down Bryssa's spirit and force compliance, her stepmother, called "Ma'am" by her orders, takes Bryssa to a men's barber shop every month to have her hair clipped short. However, despite the abysmal treatment she is forced to endure, Bryssa does not let Ma'am break her spirit and often dreams of escaping Erba, the repressive society in which she lives.

In Erba, everyone does as they are told. They attend the schools specifically assigned to them based on class, and they train for jobs deemed appropriate for their income level. There is no chance for advancement. There is no hope of becoming "better" than you already are, financially. Though she is privileged by birth, her stepmother's influence has relegated her to the poverty-stricken working class.

Customer reviews

Bryssa falls in love with Aydan, the future ruler of Erba - knowing full well that Ma'am would never allow such a relationship, as Bryssa is "not good enough" for Aydan, and Ma'am wants to marry her own daughter off to him. Her feelings are returned, but Bryssa cannot stay in Erba, cannot live the life Ma'am has planned for her. She longs to escape, to venture to Fiss, the village that was home to her mother.

So she must leave Aydan behind and escape the life she knows. I really enjoyed Bristles. Bryssa is a strong, likeable character. I immediately related the story to the known fairytale Cinderella, but other than the basic premise - deceased parents, evil stepmother, royal love interest - the story is not so much Cinderella.

I like that Bryssa is a much more likeable character, much stronger, and wants to make her own fairy tale come true.